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tv   Newscast  BBC News  February 13, 2020 9:30pm-10:01pm GMT

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time i showed up it's not the first time i showed up on tv looking like a proper muppet. so it was the day of the reshuffling, they even put out a preview of it the night before saying these are the people who will be promoted, and everyone thought it would be interesting but it might not be interesting, because the big jobs would go — a few people had been fired in the morning, then you got that phone call explaining that? so sajid javid the chancellor had quit, deciding to resign because borisjohnson said "i love you to stay all niles chancellor but only if you stack your whole political tea m if you stack your whole political team because there will be this fabulous, in his view was quote joint team of number ten and ii to do all the things they want to do. which is maybe not unprecedented if you go back in history, but blimey, thatis you go back in history, but blimey, that is a big change in government. and that is a really big deal because number ten and ii and that is a really big deal because number ten and 11 work as these competing magnets, a push and pull, and number 11 signs the checks. but borisjohnson and his
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advisers decided they wanted to do things differently and sajid javid wasn't up for it. a couple weeks ago if you said sajid javid would get fired, i wouldn't have been surprised by that. what was surprising is the way that it pretty brutally unfolded. because we had seen stuff bubbling around in the newspapers about the relationship between the two of them, then we saw the intervention about four nights ago from sources close to sajid javid about hs2, basically saying go ahead when the government was still making up its mind, so the tensions we re making up its mind, so the tensions were there to see. absolutely. they we re were there to see. absolutely. they were not very well disguised at all, and in the end that is nothing new, some say it is a healthy part of government. but the way this unfolded like a power grab, either you lose your team or yourjob, but fascinatingly somebody who knows sajid javid very well was saying to mea sajid javid very well was saying to me a couple days ago, he was saying, "i think they might try and do this." and if they do this, what
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should he do? and of course and former adviser of his, sonya khan, was fired pretty unceremoniously at the start ofjohnson‘s government. there was a piece written on a conservative news website by paul goodman that actually categorically stated that two of the chancellor's advisers would be fired in exchange for hisjob. and the fact advisers would be fired in exchange for his job. and the fact that advisers would be fired in exchange for hisjob. and the fact that it was such good news source prompted a lot of questions in the westminster village generally. and it was so categorical that it obviously prompted questions about why had this been stated? because i don't imagine the news outlet would've published that unless they had some good sources as it were. 50 what was this really all about? is this just a couple people working inside sajid javid's office? a couple people working inside sajid javid's office? i don't think it is, i think it's more than that. it's
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power and personality is what it boils down to. there a push and pull factor. the only one that's worked in westminster is david cameron and george osborne because they saw what happened in tony blair's government with brown, and they wanted to respect each other as equals and they had a close friendship. harrison who was one of the advisers to george osborne was tweeting to that effect today, saying you had to have a respect —— is seen as equals between the two sites. the interesting thing is that i think sajid javid and boris johnson actually did have a very good personal relationship. i know the prime minister was at sajid javid's 50th birthday, they definitely expect ranged more than pleasantries, he's very signed up to johnson's agenda. so there's
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something in the wrong the below, and it is basically about who decides what happens in government. who runs the show? who runs the show, exactly. anyone who is elected and ina show, exactly. anyone who is elected and in a cabinet position will find it very difficult for unelected advisers to go out there and tell them what they should do. and it is quite clear that is what happened and sajid javid's resignation letter has what hex would call "a thinly veiled swipe" at dominic cummings, talking about the importance of having advisers with character and integrity around them, which is quite something. but there were some policy differences specifically between cummings and the chancellor over the pick of the bank of england governor, i understand they clashed over that. obviously over high—speed rail, i think they both went on a journey? sorry about that some green
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i have to say, he doesn't strike me as the kind of policy. i have to say, he doesn't strike me as the kind of policylj i have to say, he doesn't strike me as the kind of policy. i worked with him in the apartments, the tax is not something that strikes me as something that is naturally his space. so i don't know if there was some kind of difficulty over that. interestingly even if he has a policy difference, if the prime minister is sold into what the adviser is into. that it shouldn't matter. actually having a... that is so useful for a matter. actually having a... that is so usefulfor a prime minister who wa nts to so usefulfor a prime minister who wants to deflect criticism away from him. you say that, but we have addictions to these kinds of figures. here it is again. i actually know some of them a little bit and like them very much. but power really does go to your head, and if you are unelected, it goes to
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your head in a very different kind of way, because you don't have to go to the dispatch box and be answerable. you don't think power has gone to dominic's head? there is a whole system in number ten that supports it. do you think as a team that they are kind of already starting to get a bit...|j that they are kind of already starting to get a bit... i think if you go into something and you are so new and you become so powerful instantaneously, and you haven't had the edges knocked off you, i think you go a bit crazy. should we play a little bit of sajid javid? i would be interested in your reflections on it. idid be interested in your reflections on it. i did all interview with him, so on behalf of all the broadcasters, a couple questions outside of his house this afternoon. when you say the pool interview... laughter. he wasjust leaning the pool interview... laughter. he was just leaning against the
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side. i now have a question to both of you in your speed owes. play the clip! why did you reside quit till it has been a huge honour to serve as the chancellor of the exchequer. the prime minister wanted to or point me. i was unable to accept the conditions he had attached. i was left with no option other than to resign, and my successor has my full support, and the prime minister continues to enjoy my full support, as is the government. do you regard yourself as chancellor in name only? was that the... the conditions that we re was that the... the conditions that were attached as a requirement that i replaced all my political advisers — these are people who have worked incredibly hard on behalf of not just the government, but the whole country. i was unable to accept those conditions. i don't believe any self—respecting minister would accept such conditions. therefore i
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felt the best thing to do was to go. were those conditions imposed by mr cummings? those were the conditions requested by the prime minister, that was of course his prerogative. and as i said, my successor has my full support, as does the prime minister, and i will continue to support this government in any way that i can from the back benches. thank you very much. thank you so what i can reveal that had replayed the next five seconds of that tape after he walked back into his house, some bleeps would be needed for me. isaid some bleeps would be needed for me. i said something similar to the clip you played, where it was a less broad castable version of roof. two reasons, because of the nature of the language he used particularly around the reason for not continuing, but secondly — and i'd be really interested in your take on this because i wouldn't claim to know him well — but he's not someone known to m0 on camera. and ifelt know him well — but he's not someone
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known to m0 on camera. and i felt i could see him holding back his anger stopped ash and moat on camera. is that fair? so i watched that clip andi that fair? so i watched that clip and i also thought, wow. i would say it was quite interesting that he was explicit about the conditions, like he asked for my political advisers. he was holding it back but i don't know — you don't know if he's about to burst into anger or whether he was about to burst into giggles. because i think he just finds the whole thing so ridiculous. wouldn't you? ridiculous? wouldn't you find it ridiculous that you as the chancellor of the exchequer have just been essentially let go, this condition has occurred over staffing issues. it wasn't really even about something big on policy or anything else. so i think there's something about a bit of frustration, but also the ridiculousness of it. it makes you wonder in the kind of war—gaming that's gone on the last few weeks, the extent to which either side got
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the extent to which either side got the sort of proportions wrong in their head about the likelihood of either outcome — either him going or sucking up and staying.|j either outcome — either him going or sucking up and staying. i definitely think that number ten thought he would take that offer and remain as chancellor. because subsequently, but there's been questions at the lobby, and they can answer any of the questions, like when will the budget happen? are you sticking to fiscal rules? these are really critical questions! let's put aside the personality stuff that's about he said, they said. let's get to the issue — we need to know what the spending envelope will be for departments. we need to know what choices ministers will make. will this hold up the whole mechanics of the treasury? i can't imagine that they won't have to delay the budget fiow. they won't have to delay the budget now. although remember the new guy in town, rishi sunak, who's only 39...a in town, rishi sunak, who's only 39. .. a 39-year-old will in town, rishi sunak, who's only
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39... a 39-year-old will achieve great things. he's been the chief secretary to the... he's no stranger to the spreadsheets. it will be interesting to see what he does with the department. is number 11 now going to be what someone joked today about number ten he? is itjust the annex? or will he be able to develop and have budgets? the treasury is still citing the check. did you see kate forbes, the last and deliver for scotland's budget last week? she tweeted shortly after asking if he needed a hand with the budget. happy to help. let's look at rishi sunak arriving for his first day on the job, even though he's worked in the treasury for a while so it's not his first day in the business. here it was. good afternoon, chancellor. how do you feel taking over in these circumstances? delighted to be appointed, lots to get on. thanks
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very much. are you going to be the prime minister >> paul: puppet? facial expression shouts flipping hack. a year ago he was a junior member of the government. he is widely respected and tory circles, he was seen to have done a very loyal and good job during the election campaigns. out and about every day, and also given their prominent rules on some of the tv debates, which some of our newscasters listening on the podcast may have come across, he's not somebody with huge a profile with huge political heft. but he's someone who was close to michael gove, but came out very early for borisjohnson. and gove, but came out very early for boris johnson. and maybe gove, but came out very early for borisjohnson. and maybe that's got something to do with it? loyalty cou nts something to do with it? loyalty counts in politics, so it will be a bsently counts in politics, so it will be absently fascinating to see what he does with it. all the gigs are held
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by brexiteers at. i fell into this trap of thinking withdrawal agreements are done, we don't need to have that brexit and remain budget. i talk to someone early today, and it was like have we all missed a trick here? looking forward to what will happen, has there been a clear out because we don't want any more eruptions over whether we will extend the transition period and things like that? it could be we get to october and we are right back where we were last year. rishi sunak was on the television a while ago saying it doesn't matter if we don't have a trade deal with the eu. michael gove has more powerfrom today, completely in charge of the cabinet office and all its elements, he was already powerful and lots of ways. rishi sunak is now chancellor, who was an out and out brexiteer, and although sajid javid had euro sceptic tendencies, in the end he was a remainer. you have the whole list, i haven't taught up what the
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differences are. has rishi sunak sign up to a job that the predecessor said no self—respect and politician would sign up to? when i got back on the tube coming back, i kick myself for not asking that. can i give you the politician's answer? the conditions asked of sajid javid would never be the same as what was asked of rishi sunak. he's asked to re move asked of rishi sunak. he's asked to remove his team that he had appointed. anyone else going in, it's new thing. so although he's the new chancellor, going to have his own team... he can't hire whoever he wants. but he had this ready-made team from numberten, wants. but he had this ready-made team from number ten, it doesn't feel like it's the same thing. is this a sajid javid specific condition? there were noises coming out of number ten that it was that dave and george model. they want no friction and it suggests basically that what used to happen with david cameron and george osborne used to
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stitch things up before cabinet, then going to the cabinet and get things done quickly. at the idea that rishi sunak at this point is anything like an equal to the prime minister... the dave and george model work because he could say to the pm, "i know you want this but it is undeliverable. " he the pm, "i know you want this but it is undeliverable." he is an unknown quantity. we have all of her dad coming in his culture secretary. he's got a big promotion... are you looking for a new job? he's got a big promotion... are you looking for a newjob? the new climate conference in november thing that needs resolving because they didn't have a leader after she decided to leave. any other names? flag up? swell a braverman, new exit tier attorney general. watch this
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space. a few weeks ago she wrote an article for the conservative home, we are mentioning them again, saying... she's also 39, give or take. new culture secretary? ijust mentioned that a moment ago. he's seen as a back room. he was an adviser? he went to google that if he said anything public about the bbc,jim he said anything public about the bbc, jim couldn't find a single word. a rubbish episode of... but he isa word. a rubbish episode of... but he is a former adviser, so he's very sensible about what he would put on the record and hasn't. what do you put on the record? way too much! it
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wouldn't be a big moment if we didn't have a trademark back to quiz to market. i can read over your shoulder. you can keep score. let's cue shoulder. you can keep score. let's cue the music. this quiz is called... it's about rishi sunak. rishi sunak was head boy at which school? winchester sub look correct. according to my friend who went to school with him, what was his favourite take away? was in eastern paradise, golden house, orsloppy giuseppe? i reckon it was the third. no, it was a and b, indian and chinese. he can't decide, how will he make big decisions? early insights into the budget. laughter. you can even decide which 21. question three. his mum ran what kind of business and how did he
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help? he was a pharmacist. he used to work behind the counter. he worked the accounts. how old was he when he did the account? c, an early sign. in 2016, rishi sunak authored a paper — what was it on? universal credit, free ports, or why hsz might bea credit, free ports, or why hsz might be a white element? i'd love for her to be about hs two. free ports! fill in the missing words. in 2018, he co—authored a piece for the times with the headline... get a job. that was the subtext, but the headline was the subtext, but the headline was the subtext, but the headline was the tories are in deep blank, only blank blank can save us. do do, borisjohnson. only blank blank can save us. do do, boris johnson. you're mostly right, the tories are in deep peril, only borisjohnson can
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the tories are in deep peril, only boris johnson can save the tories are in deep peril, only borisjohnson can save us. the tories are in deep peril, only boris johnson can save us. peril is a better newspaper word. finally, rishi sunak has a collection of what? star trek * chips, or star wars lego figures and light sabres? probably star trek. i've seen a picture of him with sajid javid outside the star wars poster. let's hear the writ, or answer from rishi sunak himself. arrived on the midnight showings of the movies, i've read all the books, i have lots of stuff at home. toys, light sabres, legos — i also have young children as well, so there's a dual purpose for all these things. laughter. you know borisjohnson had a lightsaber on his desk in the old commons office. we did an interview and before the camera was rolling, it wasn't on it, he picked it up and was swishing it around. i think this was swishing it around. i think this was when he was mayor of london,...
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maybe that's what he will do now, running around the corridor. it's like the episode where picard had to do blah blah blah... no. i can tell you if you tried, i would've left the room. there are other news stories happening in the world. should be talked about ireland? vicki bishop texted today to say that i could ask about what was with the irish election results? none of us the irish election results? none of us can, but marion can help. how are you? we are all right, we are all looking puzzled in your direction. trying to work out while on earth has happened and what happens now after the in ireland? that makes two of us because the entire political system is feeling quite the same as the political correspondence at the moment. so i guess if wejust put it in the broader picture of where we are at, we see in other countries
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around the world have their big political shocks in recent years, and we had our one in the form of our general election the weekend. because two big things happened — firstly, the fingal government led by leo veronica who you all know there, he enjoyed a lot of support from the people here for his position on brexit and his handling of it, and he thought that would work in his favour in terms of getting back into government. in fa ct getting back into government. in fact there was some cynic suggesting the election was called at a time where he could capitalise on the brexit issue. but the campaign we felt lacked — the exit poll we did in rta after the election showed that just 1% of voters voted in rta after the election showed thatjust1% of voters voted because of brexit. so is he done for? so his party suffered the worst election in 60 years, a huge defeat. he will continue to elude lead the party from the opposite stomach opposition benches, so you won't see him on the
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world stage. so who will be the new taoiseach? that's the new question because we now have three parties with 30—something seats each. sinn fein has 37 seats, and the big story this election was the rise of sinn fein. sinn fein has gone off to talk to other left—wing parties, parties they say also carry a mandate for change, the change that the left wanted. sinn fein is trying to put a government, it doesn't look like they have the numbers. the only way they have the numbers. the only way they could to form a government numerically is with fianna fail who is said this evening it does not wa nt to is said this evening it does not want to involve itself in a government with sinn fein notjust because of policies but principal issues. so we have a three—way standoff if you want, these three main routes each trying to form a government, although finnic ale at this point is stepping aside, thinking it might best be served as
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dutch through a position on the opposition benches. there's no clear point of forming a government. it will be tricky, involving of i nte rpa rty will be tricky, involving of interparty negotiations, but also negotiations within the parties themselves... sounds like the perfect opportunity for a long—running podcast! perfect opportunity for a long-running podcast! if you think about that... i was thinking about brexit cast. good luck covering all that. i think will be returning to that. i think will be returning to that story. thank you. very quickly, rory stewart, remember him? tory leadership contender, he was going to run for mayor of london but the election happens layer— here's his invitation to the city. please have me to say. that's a weird request, but i promise to bring a sleeping bag and a box of chocolates. he is inviting himself into london and dutch london or's holmes to see how
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they live. he's made a political thing out of being not a typical politician. but i just thing out of being not a typical politician. but ijust post the thought, i wonder where the line is between that and being seen to be a bit weird? not the kind of normal politician like a vicious conservative who might have fancied the leadership, then looked at city hall in case anything imploded, go to the place where the breed prime minister is? will you be inviting him around? that's how you could do your mayoral election piece? you're obliged to. ifi had rory your mayoral election piece? you're obliged to. if i had rory stewart, then i would have all the candidates staying. you should, all in one night! slumber party. thank you for being with us on this. we will be back again soon. bye-bye. newscast from the bbc.
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hello there. last weekend we saw severe disruptions flooding to the united kingdom. this weekend coming, we have an author named storm, dennis, likely to bring some very heavy rain with a renewed risk of flooding, and also some severe gales in the north and west. before we reach that point, we have this area of low pressure which will sweep ahead of storm dennis to bring another spell of wet and windy weather. but to many central and eastern parts of friday, they will start chilli with sunshine. wins speaking up through the day, clouds increasing. wet and windy weather in the northwest slowly pushing its way eastwards. the rain not reaching until after dark, but behind it will turn very windy with gales here and also some heavy and blustery showers. the reason we see another
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storm heading our way is because of the jet stream it reinvigorating again from huge temperature contrast across north america, argent will be firing across the north atlantic, taking aim at the uk, hence we see the next storm which is storm dennis. now you see how many isobars there are on the charts, saturday and sunday those wins could be damaging with some very heavy rain associated with the system. a lot of impacts lightly from stewart and dennis, saturday to monday, wind gusts anywhere between 60—70 mph, it may be more than that. heavy rain is likely to cause some flooding across southern and western parts of the country. amber warnings at the moment are in force for parts of the southern and western england, the ground is saturated from all the rain that we had from storm keira. any more rainfall is likely to cause flooding. this is a picture for saturday, not ace pretty site with
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heavy outbreaks, persistent rain dutch not a pretty sight. 60—70 mph gusts, it will be mild but you won't feel it because of the strength of the wins. end of sunday, heavy rain tra nsfers the wins. end of sunday, heavy rain transfers and toward southeastern areas, and amber warning in force for the south downs there. lots of showers for the north and west, some of these a bit wintry over the high ground. again, we see widespread gales. temperatures in double figures in the south, cooler than the north. sunday night, likely to see a squeeze in the isobars as storm dennis continues to push toward scandinavia. so we could see gusts in excess of 75 mph across the north of the uk. in the monday, it stays blustery... lots of showers packing in a northern and western areas, but also some sunshine too. there will be some gusts up to 50 mph, there will be some gusts up to 50 ay there will be some gusts up to 50 mph, may be more in exposure. not
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quite as mild in the south, temperatures ranging from 8—10 celsius. that's how it looks through the weekend and into monday, very stormy and very wet. beyond monday, it looks like low pressure systems will scope the northwest of the country to bring strong winds and gales, outbreaks of rain. high—pressure always building in across the south. throughout next week, it will be windy with severe gales in the north and west, and it is here we will see most of the rain where the showers, a bit of snow in the north as it turns cold briefly. then the signs of it settling down midweek across southern areas as high—pressure tries to build in.
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shock at westminster as sajid javid resigns as chancellor in the middle of the prime minister's reshuffle. he was asked to stay on but refused after the prime minister ordered him to sack his entire team of advisers. i don't believe any self—respecting minister would accept such conditions and so, therefore, ifelt the best thing to do was to go. he was quickly replaced by 39—year—old rishi sunak, his deputy at the treasury who's had a meteoric rise. a relative newcomer tonight in one of the biggestjobs in government, a more dramatic today than anyone had expected. also tonight... one of the 15 babies whose deaths could have been prevented families welcome an independent review into maternity services

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